Save the Date! MAS 2019 Annual Meeting: Saturday, November 16

The business meeting will be held from 10:00 AM until 12:00 PM, lunch from 12:00 PM until 1:00 PM and talks from 1:00 PM until 3:30 PM.

Three speakers will be presenting during the afternoon session:

Speaker: Dr. John P. Hart
Title: Recent Research on Northern Iroquoian Agriculture
Abstract: It is well known that Iroquoian people were highly dependent on maize-based agriculture for subsistence. In this presentation I will review the results of recent research on carbon and nitrogen isotopes that provide new information on how Iroquoian farmers in New York and Ontario maintained the fertility of agricultural fields and how much maize was included in fourteenth- to seventeenth-century Iroquoian diets in Ontario.
Brief Bio: Dr. John P. Hart is Director, Research and Collections Division at the New York State Museum in Albany, where he has worked since 1994. Dr. Hart’s archaeological research is focused on the histories and evolutions of Native American agriculture in northeastern North America. In recent years he has also done research using social network analysis to understand how people were interacting across northern Iroquoia from the mid-fourteenth to mid-seventeenth centuries. In 2017 he was presented with the Society for American Archaeology’s Award for Excellence in Collections-Based Research.

Speaker: David S. Robinson

Abstract: Underwater Archaeology off Block Island.

Brief Bio: Chief Archaeologist/State Underwater Archaeologist,Board of Underwater Archaeological Resources

MAS Nov 2019 M Dudek Abstract and Short Bio

More information will be posted as it becomes available. 

The Bulletin is now accepting submissions for our next issue.

Please contact editor Ryan Wheeler about your draft article or ideas via email at ryanjwheeler@gmail.com.

The Bulletin is the main, peer-reviewed publishing vehicle of the Massachusetts Archaeological Society and was first published in October 1939. Articles focused on Massachusetts archaeology, anthropology, and allied fields are sought. Archived copies can be found on the website of Bridgewater State University: https://vc.bridgew.edu/bmas/

Authors should follow the basic formatting of recent issues and should submit materials electronically in MS Word. Images should be high resolution, at least 600 dpi, and in jpg or tif format.

M.A.S. Loses a Towering Figure and Friend

If you read the memorial to Gene then you can get some sense of why his life is being celebrated throughout the Northeast.

Gene twice served as president of the MAS, 1958-1960 and 1996-1998. Each time he guided the Society through important transitions.

Gene was the Museum Coordinator for the Robbins from the fall of 1999 to the fall of 2012. When the Museum (and the Society) was in need Gene found a way to help. He was not only responsible for designing and constructing some of the exhibits but often for acquiring the cases in which the items were displayed. Gene used his contacts throughout the archaeological community to find cases that were available and then he would either arrange for someone to pay for the shipping of the units to the Robbins or he would pay the freight costs himself. He occasionally designed the devices used to mount the artifacts within the cases. His gifts to the MAS did not end with display items.

When the Society needed new racks for artifact storage, Gene purchased them with his own funds. He also acquired the trays used to hold the artifacts. Often the source of these items was the Robert S. Peabody Museum, an institution (along with the staff) that was very dear to his heart.

When the education department needed source materials for a teacher training program, Gene loaned them books from his extensive personal library.

Along with the physical objects that Gene donated to the MAS, the other things that he gave mattered more.

Gene was always ready, willing and more than able to share his vast knowledge of New England archaeology, whether the recipients were fellow archaeologists, students or visitors to the Museum. Gene’s recall of past events and the people involved was legendary. He would be asked about an event from the late 1950’s and without hesitation he would describe the situation. During a recent discussion at an MAS board meeting he helped resolve an issue by describing a similar situation that he had witnessed many years ago at the Peabody.

Emily, Age 11, lives in a town on Buzzards Bay and walks her dog, Rocky on the beach every day. She’s always on the lookout for interesting things on these walks and came up with two very nice artifacts Her mother brought Emily to the Robbins Museum in Middleborough where they were identified by Eugene Winter, the Robbins Museum Coordinator, as Native American points.

Emily, Age 11, lives in a town on Buzzards Bay and walks her dog, Rocky on the beach every day. She’s always on the lookout for interesting things on these walks and came up with two very nice artifacts Her mother brought Emily to the Robbins Museum in Middleborough where they were identified by Eugene Winter, the Robbins Museum Coordinator, as Native American points.

Then there was the pleasure derived from just being in his company. Gene always had a story that would have you rolling in the aisles (if the Museum had an aisle). One would have paid an admission fee to attend the Wednesday lunches at the Robbins when Gene, Jeff Boudreau and the others in attendance would discuss the many unresolved questions in New England archaeology. On what turned out to be his last visit to the Robbins Gene brought his guitar and serenaded the Wednesday crew.

Gene was one of those rare individuals who made the world a better place just by his existence. He will truly be missed.

A Memorial Service and celebration of Gene’s life was held on Saturday, April 5, 2014, at the Robert S. Peabody Museum, Andover, MA.

Join a M.A.S. Chapter

Want to be with like minded individuals in your area?  Want to learn more about archaeology in your area?  Join a M.A.S. Chapter in your area!

There are 4 chapters in the state of Massachusetts that meet on a regular basis.

Want to be with like minded individuals in your area?  Want to learn more about archaeology in your area?  Join a M.A.S. Chapter in your area.

Southeast Chapter:      d.p.burbine@gmail.com

Central Mass Chapter:  info.centralchapter@massarchaeology.org

Northeast Chapter :     info.nechapter@massarchaeology.org