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M.A.S. fosters public under-standing through educational programs and publications, and promotes scientific research; careful, well-directed archaeological activity; conservation of sites, data, and artifacts; and seeks to prevent the collection of specimens for commercial purposes.

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Still time to catch Dr. Calvin Mires talk on Tuesday, January 19 at 7pm. Sign up through info.nechapter@massarchaeology.com. Bridgewater State University #digMass #underwater #archaeology #massachusetts ... See MoreSee Less

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Thanks, Craig! The MAS Trustees are working hard to better connect with members like you and with archaeological enthusiasts in #Massachusetts and all over New England. And our revamped Bulletin is just one part of it. Stay tuned for more on our programs and new efforts to fulfill our preservation, research and education mission!
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We don't have to dig very deep to say THANK YOU to the Mass Cultural Council for their recent grant in support of our Robbins Museum of Archaeology! The Trustees, members, and volunteers are deeply honored to be among the recipients of the Cultural Organization Economic Recovery Grant, helping to sustain the Robbins and our statewide preservation and education mission. The Arts & Culture sector has been deeply impacted by the pandemic and we welcome the partnership that MCC has extended through this program. For more on the grant, please visit massculturalcouncil.org. And, look for upcoming announcements about our virtual programs -- Diggin' In Season 2 starts January 27 -- as well as opportunities to further support Mass Archaeology!
#digMass #MassArchaeology #powerofculture #mapoli #archaeology #science #culture #history #Massachusetts
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4,600 medium iced coffees from Dunkin' to measure an archaeological feature? Sounds like the perfect way to calculate the size of a hole on an archaeological site!
#digMass #MassArchaeology #BostonDigsWithDunkinAn important math lesson from your local Boston archaeology team. Like many of you, we were wondering how many Dunkies medium iced coffees (extra extra) would take to fill in the Mary L. Pierce well in Ronan Park, aka the #DorchesterSinkhole. Well, your wait is over.

As every news outlet in the region has reported, the Dorchester Sinkhole in fact a 19th century well built around 1818 or 1872 that was buried under a bunch of fill to make Ronan Park around 1912. Yeah, old news. Its historic well cover recently failed, apparently, and after a recent rain storm, the loosened fill slumped down into the well opening a sink hole in the park.

Let’s start with the easy part. The well itself is 2.5 wide by 6.5 feet deep (it partially filled up with the dirt from above). We all remember that the volume of a cylinder is πr²h. (That’s pronounced “pie-ah-sqwahd-aych”), so the well is π*1.25²*6.5 or 31.91 cubic feet.

Cool.

Now the hard part: the fill on top. A cone’s volume is ⅓ the volume of a cylinder of the same radius, but this ain’t. no. cone. This is a CONICAL FRUSTUM, people! That’s a cone without the pointy bit.

The volume of a frustum is (1/3) π h (r1² + r2² + (r1 * r2)). Stay with me, folks. R1, the top of the hole is 2’ (don't forget radius is half the diameter!). R2 is the top of the well, 1.25’. H is 10, so the volume of the frustum is (1/3) * π * 10 * (2² + 1.25² + (2 * 1.25)) or a whopping 84.43 cubic feet.

Add them together (31.91+84.43) and the #Dorchester sinkhole is 116.34 ft³ big.

Now for the important part. A medium iced coffee is 24oz. or 0.025 cubic feet. If we divide the hole’s volume by a single medium coffee (116.34/0.025), you find out you will need 4,653.6 Dunkies medium iced coffees to fill the Dorchester hole.

Now you’re wicked smaht.

What else would it take to fill it? Does anyone know the volume of David Ortiz?

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The MAS Bulletin is printed and making its way to members with a special article on transportation archaeology. (How about that snappy cover?) You can read more in our Fall/Winter e-newsletter. And check out other updates from Mass Archaeology, including our upcoming Gene Winter Chapter lecture on Dec. 15th at 7pm. To find out how to get on the Zoom invite list, read on!
mailchi.mp/.../read-the-mas-bulletin-online-for...
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Get ready for our next virtual MAS Gene Winter Chapter event when we welcome Dr. Jordon Loucks, Principal Investigator from SEARCH, Inc. On Tuesday, December 15 at 7pm, Dr. Loucks will examine the #archaeology and #anthropology surrounding #ethnicity, #racism and the #immigrant experience in 19th C. Want to join the conversation? Send an email to info.nechapter@massarchaeology.org to get on the Zoom invitation list and take part in our #free programming. Learn more about Dr. Louck's research at jordondloucks.wordpress.com And be sure to check out Dr. Louck's new book -- available through rowman.com/ISBN/9781793611758/An-Archaeology-of-Ethnicity-Race-and-Consumption-in-New-York
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