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We’ve reached the end of Dr. Wheeler’s summer reading list. We hope you enjoyed it! If we have your email, we’ll send the list out to you shortly so that you’ll have it as a handy reference. If we don’t have it, you can subscribe to MAS emails by clicking this link: bit.ly/362KsD6. Happy reading!

“Rubbish! The Archaeology of Garbage by Bill Rathje. This is a fun book and recounts the work that Rathje and his University of Arizona students did on modern refuse disposal habits and how this could be applied to archaeological sites. Rathje was a big proponent of Behavioral Archaeology, so you get some of that theory as well.” ... See MoreSee Less

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We’ve reached the penultimate summer recommendation in Dr. Wheeler’s list, and it’s a classic. It might be a little bit dated, but it’s still a must read.

“Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind by Donald Johanson. I carried this book around with me for a year in high school, reading and re-reading it. Dated now, with so many new discoveries, but really well written, and it gives a sense of the scholarly battles that still rage over human origins. Pair with Lee Berger’s more recent Almost Human and you get a pretty good sense of the complexities of paleoanthropology.” ... See MoreSee Less

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If you’re into mummies, then Ryan’s 10th recommendation is for you!

“The Bog People by Peter Glob. Iron Age mummies from European bogs. Some crazy preservation that you only get in wet sites (anaerobic conditions). If you read this, you will want more on wet-site archaeology!” ... See MoreSee Less

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Saturday’s book recommendation from Dr. Wheeler is an oldie but goodie.

“Gods, Graves, and Scholars by C.W. Ceram. This was published in 1949 but tells the stories of many of the great archaeological discoveries up to the mid-20th century. Heinrich Schliemann at Troy, Howard Carter and King Tut, etc. You sorta have to read this if you are an archaeologist.” ... See MoreSee Less

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It’s Friday, so it’s time for some fun! And I can’t think of any archaeology-related book that I had more fun reading than Bulletin Editor Ryan Wheeler’s 8th recommendation.

“Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries by Kenneth Feder. This book covers all the kooky ideas about North American archaeology, and why people believe them. It’s lots of fun, well written, and you can’t help learning along the way.” ... See MoreSee Less

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What’s the future of archaeology? This is the subject the author explores in Dr. Wheeler’s 7th summer book recommendation.

“The Science of Archaeology? Richard ‘Scotty’ MacNeish’s autobiographical musing on the future of archaeology.” ... See MoreSee Less

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We’re halfway through the week and through our list! Dr. Wheeler’s 6th summer book recommendation is a classic. If you haven’t read it, you’re in for a treat.

“The Early Mesoamerican Village by Kent Flannery. The major selling points of this book are that it is well written, highly readable, and that between the chapters there are these fictional interludes featuring The Great Synthesizer, The Skeptical Graduate Student, and The Real Mesoamerican Archaeologist. Archaeological writing at its best!” ... See MoreSee Less

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