The Robbins Museum is Participating in the Passport To History Program!

Passport to History is a joint effort of nine local museums, spearheaded by the Old Colony History Museum, to share and explore the fantastic and diverse history of southeastern Massachusetts. At any participating museum, guests can pick up a passport and complete a location-specific activity to earn a passport stamp. Altogether, visitors will have a chance to explore and learn about the exciting and varied history of the Old Colony region.

The participating museums are Old Colony History MuseumFuller Craft MuseumCarpenter MuseumHanover Historical SocietyFreetown Historical SocietyMiddleborough Historical AssociationThe Robbins MuseumDuxbury Rural and Historical Society, and Attleboro Area Industrial Museum. Many of the listed museums are offering free admission for those on their first visit with the passport.

Additionally, to celebrate the launch of the passport, we are holding a raffle for those able to visit sites by September 1, 2017. Prizes include tickets to the New England Aquarium and tickets to the Paw Sox. All you have to do is share a picture taken at one of the museums and tag it #PassporttoHistory to enter! You can enter a total of 9 times if you make it to all 9! Stop by the Museum to learn more and we hope you enjoy exploring local museums this summer!

M.A.S. Loses a Towering Figure and Friend

If you read the memorial to Gene then you can get some sense of why his life is being celebrated throughout the Northeast.

Gene twice served as president of the MAS, 1958-1960 and 1996-1998. Each time he guided the Society through important transitions.

Gene was the Museum Coordinator for the Robbins from the fall of 1999 to the fall of 2012. When the Museum (and the Society) was in need Gene found a way to help. He was not only responsible for designing and constructing some of the exhibits but often for acquiring the cases in which the items were displayed. Gene used his contacts throughout the archaeological community to find cases that were available and then he would either arrange for someone to pay for the shipping of the units to the Robbins or he would pay the freight costs himself. He occasionally designed the devices used to mount the artifacts within the cases. His gifts to the MAS did not end with display items.

When the Society needed new racks for artifact storage, Gene purchased them with his own funds. He also acquired the trays used to hold the artifacts. Often the source of these items was the Robert S. Peabody Museum, an institution (along with the staff) that was very dear to his heart.

When the education department needed source materials for a teacher training program, Gene loaned them books from his extensive personal library.

Along with the physical objects that Gene donated to the MAS, the other things that he gave mattered more.

Gene was always ready, willing and more than able to share his vast knowledge of New England archaeology, whether the recipients were fellow archaeologists, students or visitors to the Museum. Gene’s recall of past events and the people involved was legendary. He would be asked about an event from the late 1950’s and without hesitation he would describe the situation. During a recent discussion at an MAS board meeting he helped resolve an issue by describing a similar situation that he had witnessed many years ago at the Peabody.

Emily, Age 11, lives in a town on Buzzards Bay and walks her dog, Rocky on the beach every day. She’s always on the lookout for interesting things on these walks and came up with two very nice artifacts Her mother brought Emily to the Robbins Museum in Middleborough where they were identified by Eugene Winter, the Robbins Museum Coordinator, as Native American points.

Emily, Age 11, lives in a town on Buzzards Bay and walks her dog, Rocky on the beach every day. She’s always on the lookout for interesting things on these walks and came up with two very nice artifacts Her mother brought Emily to the Robbins Museum in Middleborough where they were identified by Eugene Winter, the Robbins Museum Coordinator, as Native American points.

Then there was the pleasure derived from just being in his company. Gene always had a story that would have you rolling in the aisles (if the Museum had an aisle). One would have paid an admission fee to attend the Wednesday lunches at the Robbins when Gene, Jeff Boudreau and the others in attendance would discuss the many unresolved questions in New England archaeology. On what turned out to be his last visit to the Robbins Gene brought his guitar and serenaded the Wednesday crew.

Gene was one of those rare individuals who made the world a better place just by his existence. He will truly be missed.

A Memorial Service and celebration of Gene’s life was held on Saturday, April 5, 2014, at the Robert S. Peabody Museum, Andover, MA.

Join a M.A.S. Chapter

Want to be with like minded individuals in your area?  Want to learn more about archaeology in your area?  Join a M.A.S. Chapter in your area!

There are 4 chapters in the state of Massachusetts that meet on a regular basis.

Want to be with like minded individuals in your area?  Want to learn more about archaeology in your area?  Join a M.A.S. Chapter in your area.

Southeast Chapter:      d.p.burbine@gmail.com

Central Mass Chapter:  info.centralchapter@massarchaeology.org

Northeast Chapter :     info.nechapter@massarchaeology.org

Western Chapter:          info.wchapter@massarchaeology.org